BestSinceDayOne! Mar 4 @ 1:43pm
Feeling sick
Well ima quickly say i grew up playing Doom and Doom 2, but now i am considerably older (as is the game) i am now getting motion sick (i think) due to what i put down is the narrower FoV in Doom 1 and 2, Doom 3 i am more than fine.

Basically does anyone know of a mod or something to help fix this?

Also is this just me, or do other people get sick while playing these?
Last edited by BestSinceDayOne!; Mar 4 @ 1:46pm
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Living Tribunal (Banned) Mar 4 @ 1:52pm 
"The Doom rendering engine is the core of the game engine that powers Doom and its sequels, and that is used as a base to power other games by id Software licensees, notably Heretic, Hexen, and Strife. It was created by John Carmack, with auxiliary functions written by John Romero, Dave Taylor, and Paul Radek.[1] Originally developed on NeXT computers, it was ported to DOS for Doom's initial release, and later ported to several other operating systems and game consoles.

The source code for the Linux version of the Doom games was released to the public in 1997 under a license that granted rights to non-commercial use, and re-released under the GNU General Public License in 1999. As a result, dozens of user-developed source ports have been created which allow Doom to run on previously unsupported operating systems, often fix bugs (including the static limits noted below), and sometimes radically expand the engine's functionality with new features.

It is not a true "3D" engine (as it is not possible to look up and down properly, and one sector cannot be placed above or beneath another), but is however a fairly elegant system which allows pseudo-3D rendering. When first published, Doom was revolutionary and almost unique in its ability to provide a fast texture-mapped 3D environment on contemporary hardware — late-model 386 and early 486 PCs, without specialised 3D graphics hardware, running at clock speeds of around 25-33MHz.

Despite the simplicity and speed of the renderer, it has limitations. The base renderer relies on 16.16 fixed point numbers (whole numbers between -32,768 and 32,767 with fractions limited to multiples of 1/65,536). Due to such limitations, accuracy in small units is lost as the limited precision hinders accuracy especially when multiplying and dividing. High resolutions cause more graphical glitches especially above the 5,000 pixel resolution range, some glitches appear as field of view distortions along with floors and ceilings extending towards the horizon. "

Basically it is pseudo-3D, and the rendering is making you feel that way. There is no FOV option because it isn't real 3D yet 2D. To change the FOV in such a way you'd need a z coordinate...not a x,y coordinate with a pseudo z creating pseudo 3D. Your best option is to run the originals off ZDoom, and using the options to give a more free view, but that won't change it dramatically, so you'd probably still get sick anyways. -dev major. D:
Last edited by Living Tribunal; Mar 4 @ 1:53pm
Living Tribunal (Banned) Mar 4 @ 1:59pm 
Another option is to run it off xp or another DOS[disc operating system] based OS to slow the rate of motion down...newer ports of the game will make you far more sick as they can render the graphics soooooooooooooo much faster. You'll notice more of a lag in your FOV running it off DOS rather than new ports with higher rendering modifications.
Last edited by Living Tribunal; Mar 4 @ 2:08pm
Rockhead Gaz Mar 4 @ 1:59pm 
Originally posted by Vash the Stampede:
"The Doom rendering engine is the core of the game engine that powers Doom and its sequels, and that is used as a base to power other games by id Software licensees, notably Heretic, Hexen, and Strife. It was created by John Carmack, with auxiliary functions written by John Romero, Dave Taylor, and Paul Radek.[1] Originally developed on NeXT computers, it was ported to DOS for Doom's initial release, and later ported to several other operating systems and game consoles.

The source code for the Linux version of the Doom games was released to the public in 1997 under a license that granted rights to non-commercial use, and re-released under the GNU General Public License in 1999. As a result, dozens of user-developed source ports have been created which allow Doom to run on previously unsupported operating systems, often fix bugs (including the static limits noted below), and sometimes radically expand the engine's functionality with new features.

It is not a true "3D" engine (as it is not possible to look up and down properly, and one sector cannot be placed above or beneath another), but is however a fairly elegant system which allows pseudo-3D rendering. When first published, Doom was revolutionary and almost unique in its ability to provide a fast texture-mapped 3D environment on contemporary hardware — late-model 386 and early 486 PCs, without specialised 3D graphics hardware, running at clock speeds of around 25-33MHz.

Despite the simplicity and speed of the renderer, it has limitations. The base renderer relies on 16.16 fixed point numbers (whole numbers between -32,768 and 32,767 with fractions limited to multiples of 1/65,536). Due to such limitations, accuracy in small units is lost as the limited precision hinders accuracy especially when multiplying and dividing. High resolutions cause more graphical glitches especially above the 5,000 pixel resolution range, some glitches appear as field of view distortions along with floors and ceilings extending towards the horizon. "

Basically it is pseudo-3D, and the rendering is making you feel that way. There is no FOV option because it isn't real 3D yet 2D. To change the FOV in such a way you'd need a z coordinate...not a x,y coordinate with a pseudo z creating pseudo 3D. Your best option is to run the originals off ZDoom, and using the options to give a more free view, but that won't change it dramatically, so you'd probably still get sick anyways. -dev major. D:

Probably not entirely necessary, but a very interesting response, nonetheless.
Living Tribunal (Banned) Mar 4 @ 2:00pm 
Originally posted by Rockhead Gaz:
Originally posted by Vash the Stampede:
"The Doom rendering engine is the core of the game engine that powers Doom and its sequels, and that is used as a base to power other games by id Software licensees, notably Heretic, Hexen, and Strife. It was created by John Carmack, with auxiliary functions written by John Romero, Dave Taylor, and Paul Radek.[1] Originally developed on NeXT computers, it was ported to DOS for Doom's initial release, and later ported to several other operating systems and game consoles.

The source code for the Linux version of the Doom games was released to the public in 1997 under a license that granted rights to non-commercial use, and re-released under the GNU General Public License in 1999. As a result, dozens of user-developed source ports have been created which allow Doom to run on previously unsupported operating systems, often fix bugs (including the static limits noted below), and sometimes radically expand the engine's functionality with new features.

It is not a true "3D" engine (as it is not possible to look up and down properly, and one sector cannot be placed above or beneath another), but is however a fairly elegant system which allows pseudo-3D rendering. When first published, Doom was revolutionary and almost unique in its ability to provide a fast texture-mapped 3D environment on contemporary hardware — late-model 386 and early 486 PCs, without specialised 3D graphics hardware, running at clock speeds of around 25-33MHz.

Despite the simplicity and speed of the renderer, it has limitations. The base renderer relies on 16.16 fixed point numbers (whole numbers between -32,768 and 32,767 with fractions limited to multiples of 1/65,536). Due to such limitations, accuracy in small units is lost as the limited precision hinders accuracy especially when multiplying and dividing. High resolutions cause more graphical glitches especially above the 5,000 pixel resolution range, some glitches appear as field of view distortions along with floors and ceilings extending towards the horizon. "

Basically it is pseudo-3D, and the rendering is making you feel that way. There is no FOV option because it isn't real 3D yet 2D. To change the FOV in such a way you'd need a z coordinate...not a x,y coordinate with a pseudo z creating pseudo 3D. Your best option is to run the originals off ZDoom, and using the options to give a more free view, but that won't change it dramatically, so you'd probably still get sick anyways. -dev major. D:

Probably not entirely necessary, but a very interesting response, nonetheless.
:D
MuricanPatriot™ Mar 4 @ 3:25pm 
Turn down the motion blur. I don't usually get motion sick but I couldn't play the game with it on.
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Date Posted: Mar 4 @ 1:43pm
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