kidpython Jan 10, 2013 @ 5:48pm
Why they call it a "Wonder Victory"
So I got my first Wonder Victory last night and discovered why it is called that. I had over 125K of dust and so I was able to completed the build on the 5 planets on the same turn using buyouts. I hit "End Turn" and .... nothing happened! I checked the status at the top and it reported that I now had 100% for that victory condition. Somewhat exasperated I hit "End Turn" again and finally the Wonder Victory happened. So clearly the Wonder Victory is coded to make you wonder what the heck is going on!

That is all. Carry on...
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Steph'nie  [developer] Jan 11, 2013 @ 1:15am 
It is required to hit one more turn once the five wonders are built, in case another player takes one of your system.
kidpython Jan 11, 2013 @ 7:09am 
So you have to build them and defend them for a year. I guess that makes sense. But for the sake of game play, why not make it 10 years? In any case if memory serves the tech tree description only says that you have to build them and if that is so then it is clearly wrong.
¦ö¦ ƒ ì ᴙ e ¦ö¦ Jan 12, 2013 @ 9:26am 
Originally posted by kidpython:
So you have to build them and defend them for a year. I guess that makes sense. But for the sake of game play, why not make it 10 years? In any case if memory serves the tech tree description only says that you have to build them and if that is so then it is clearly wrong.
As Steph'nie mentions, it's to prevent players from quickly building the improvement in SSes with high industry but very prone to attack just to quickly beat the game. If you're a faction that's on the verge of death but can still barely make them to survive, it shouldn't exactly be your victory, since you basically cheesed the win. Though, I don't think ES accounted for buyouts of that improvement, however. The high industry requirement was to make it so that you had to wait several turns/years. But oh well.
kidpython Jan 13, 2013 @ 12:59am 
Yeah I only needed to take one more system to win an expansion victory but I thought that doing the wonder thing would be fun. To be fair you need high tech, high industry and high dust to pull this victory off quickly. As it was I had to build for about 5 turns after I got the tech before the buyout total was down to a level that fit my budget. By doing it with buyouts, the opponents had no chance to see what I was up to (not that they could have prevented it anyhow.)

I don't mind the way this victory condition works, Just pointing out that the in-game description of the victory process is misleading.
Dorok Jan 13, 2013 @ 1:34pm 
It's right that the end of this victory is a bit surprising, but well there's few chance the player doesn't play the next turn. In fact I believed it was a bug so I was going to play another victory I had planed in parallel.

It's perhaps how I played but I felt that in comparison of other victories this one seems easier for a faction not specialized in science or war nor economy.

With Amoeba the diplomatic victory seems quite tricky, I only reach 50% in that game and I did get only one war at minimal duration and because of an ally. You certainly need not take the economic lead but then not lost seems tricky.
¦ö¦ ƒ ì ᴙ e ¦ö¦ Jan 13, 2013 @ 1:35pm 
Originally posted by kidpython:
Yeah I only needed to take one more system to win an expansion victory but I thought that doing the wonder thing would be fun. To be fair you need high tech, high industry and high dust to pull this victory off quickly. As it was I had to build for about 5 turns after I got the tech before the buyout total was down to a level that fit my budget. By doing it with buyouts, the opponents had no chance to see what I was up to (not that they could have prevented it anyhow.)

I don't mind the way this victory condition works, Just pointing out that the in-game description of the victory process is misleading.
Other factions can see what you're developing? I never knew that.

Originally posted by Dorok:
It's right that the end of this victory is a bit surprising, but well there's few chance the player doesn't play the next turn. In fact I believed it was a bug so I was going to play another victory I had planed in parallel.

It's perhaps how I played but I felt that in comparison of other victories this one seems easier for a faction not specialized in science or war nor economy.

With Amoeba the diplomatic victory seems quite tricky, I only reach 50% in that game and I did get only one war at minimal duration and because of an ally. You certainly need not take the economic lead but then not lost seems tricky.
The description for Diplomatic Victory is misleading. It doesn't really take into factor whether you engage in war or not (it may, but not by a large percentage). At around mid-game, I started just attacking other factions, and still won via Diplomacy, way ahead of all the other victory types.
Last edited by ¦ö¦ ƒ ì ᴙ e ¦ö¦; Jan 13, 2013 @ 1:36pm
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Date Posted: Jan 10, 2013 @ 5:48pm
Posts: 6