Adam Crate Feb 12, 2014 @ 5:00pm
Why Aren't They My Vassals?
Hey, I've been playing for about 30 hours now and there's still plenty I'm trying to figure out about CKII. I have run into a roadblock trying to conquer the kingdom of Hungary (I started as a single duke, conquered almost half of the kingdom, but I'm 1 county short of having 50%). With higher crown laws put in place, I can't brute force my way through the remaining counties by forging claims. I decided to try and take a more tactful route, and that backfired on me...

Apparently, I'm missing something here. I set my sights on two different duchies. I checked to see the line of succession, then picked the highest up that I could go, and married someone of my dynasty into it. In one case it was my daughter (I married her matrinally) and in the other it was my brother. Both of the people they were married to were next in line for their duchies, so I figured I just had to sit back and wait for the current leaders to croak.

Well, both of them died and neither of the duchies became my vassals. I presumed because - in both situations - the heir to the duchies were linked to my close dynasty they would become mine. However, that doesn't seem to be the case. What am I missing here? How could I have made this situation work? There has to be something to conquering counties / duchies peacefully that I'm not understanding.

Thanks for any help. As difficult as it is to get into, CKII is really a great game. I love the depth.
Showing 1-15 of 20 comments
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Well...That Happened Feb 12, 2014 @ 5:08pm 
dukes can't become vassals to dukes.
Adam Crate Feb 12, 2014 @ 5:11pm 
So would this have worked if I was targeting the counties underneath those dukes? The reason I didn't do that was because I thought they would end up as vassals of those dukes.
ShadoWwolF Feb 12, 2014 @ 5:14pm 
Originally posted by Crate:
So would this have worked if I was targeting the counties underneath those dukes? The reason I didn't do that was because I thought they would end up as vassals of those dukes.

it depends, it can be tricky sometimes. if you landed them first then they would be landed vassals of yours and would just inherit the other lands and stay your vassal but if they were unlanded when they inherited the other counties then yes they would most likely leave your court and become their vassal. if you were a king you couldve made those dukes your vassals via the same method
Adam Crate Feb 12, 2014 @ 5:17pm 
Originally posted by ShadoWwolF:
Originally posted by Crate:
So would this have worked if I was targeting the counties underneath those dukes? The reason I didn't do that was because I thought they would end up as vassals of those dukes.

it depends, it can be tricky sometimes. if you landed them first then they would be landed vassals of yours and would just inherit the other lands and stay your vassal but if they were unlanded when they inherited the other counties then yes they would most likely leave your court and become their vassal. if you were a king you couldve made those dukes your vassals via the same method

Ah, okay, that makes sense. Would that still apply if they weren't part of my dynasty? Could I technically give anyone in my court a county, then marry them into the line of succession for another county and they would inherit it while remaining my vassal?
ShadoWwolF Feb 12, 2014 @ 5:19pm 
Originally posted by Crate:
Originally posted by ShadoWwolF:

it depends, it can be tricky sometimes. if you landed them first then they would be landed vassals of yours and would just inherit the other lands and stay your vassal but if they were unlanded when they inherited the other counties then yes they would most likely leave your court and become their vassal. if you were a king you couldve made those dukes your vassals via the same method

Ah, okay, that makes sense. Would that still apply if they weren't part of my dynasty? Could I technically give anyone in my court a county, then marry them into the line of succession for another county and they would inherit it while remaining my vassal?

yep. it just helps if its your dynasty because in the case of not being able to fix the succession the way you want or the character dying off you can always press the claims of a dynasty member and they'll automatically become your vassal whether you land them or not. you could still press the claims of someone who isnt of your dynasty but you'll have to land them first and make them a vassal first before pressing the claims
Adam Crate Feb 12, 2014 @ 5:24pm 
Originally posted by ShadoWwolF:
Originally posted by Crate:

Ah, okay, that makes sense. Would that still apply if they weren't part of my dynasty? Could I technically give anyone in my court a county, then marry them into the line of succession for another county and they would inherit it while remaining my vassal?

yep. it just helps if its your dynasty because in the case of not being able to fix the succession the way you want or the character dying off you can always press the claims of a dynasty member and they'll automatically become your vassal whether you land them or not. you could still press the claims of someone who isnt of your dynasty but you'll have to land them first and make them a vassal first before pressing the claims

Thank you very much. That actually cleared a lot up. I'm a bit screwed right now because I'm playing Ironclad mode...oh well.
Corrupted Sanity Feb 12, 2014 @ 5:26pm 
Well, that's something new for me to try. I never thought about doing that to set up one of my vassals to inherit something.

With that kind of thing you have to make sure they have a lower rank than you. If one of your vassal counts inherits a dutchy when you're a duke, they'll just leave and take that county with them.
_DaWe_ Feb 13, 2014 @ 12:08am 
It's a dangerous play. Only the children of those you have married would become your vassals (if the person you married was your vassal previously), but if they inherit the other parent's titles first, then exactly the opposite would happen, they will take your counties.
Last edited by _DaWe_; Feb 13, 2014 @ 12:08am
Adam Crate Feb 13, 2014 @ 4:08am 
Originally posted by _DaWe_:
It's a dangerous play. Only the children of those you have married would become your vassals (if the person you married was your vassal previously), but if they inherit the other parent's titles first, then exactly the opposite would happen, they will take your counties.

Oh, that doesn't sound good at all. Is there a safer way to take counties peacefully? The only surefire method I've found is forging claims and going to war, which I can't do with the higher crown laws in place.
ShadoWwolF Feb 13, 2014 @ 10:45am 
Originally posted by _DaWe_:
It's a dangerous play. Only the children of those you have married would become your vassals (if the person you married was your vassal previously), but if they inherit the other parent's titles first, then exactly the opposite would happen, they will take your counties.

or you know you could just land those children so they're already your vassals no matter which parent dies first
_DaWe_ Feb 13, 2014 @ 11:54am 
Only if the children stay at the court of your vassal.
ShadoWwolF Feb 13, 2014 @ 12:00pm 
Originally posted by _DaWe_:
Only if the children stay at the court of your vassal.

originally he wasnt talking about marrying a vassal to another landed character anyway. he was talking about marrying an unlanded male character to an unlanded female character of his dynasty and then assassinating people so that the male character would inherit his parents titles. if you did it as a matrillineal marriage then he goes to your court and you can just give him land to make him a vassal and then theres no way the situation you described could happen anyway unless he inherits a title bigger than yours. hes a landed vassal. he inherits more land but stays your vassal. his kids are going to stay your vassal whether he dies first or his unlanded mother dies first. it wouldnt matter. the only time the situation you described would happen is if the female was the one inheriting land and she became a vassal of somebody else. then you just have to make sure the male dies first and then the female and not the other way around

EDIT: ok i see he tried both, in my responses to him i was only talking about the one with the daughter, for the brother it would be the situation i mentioned above with just making sure he dies first and then his wife did
Last edited by ShadoWwolF; Feb 13, 2014 @ 12:04pm
Adam Crate Feb 13, 2014 @ 3:34pm 
Hmm, I made a miscalculation today and I had to fight to correct it. I decided to press the claims of somebody in my court, so I gave them a county and then declared war. I won, but instead of remaining as my vassal with a new county, I lost the county I gave them + the new one I was fighting for. My only guess is that the title I was fighting for was a Duke position. I am a Grand Duke, but I guess that doesn't count in terms of out-ranking someone?

Would this have worked if I was fighting for the county itself and not a Duke position? I ended up declaring war on him to get my old county back; it was really just a waste of time more than anything.
HerrComrade Feb 13, 2014 @ 4:26pm 
Pretty sure Grand Duke is a Russian cultural title for Duke, like Doux is for the Greek and Emir for Arabic.

Titles are Baron > Count > Duke > King > Emperor. If you have a blue border it's a Ducal rank, even if it says "Petty King" or "Grand Poobah"; to have Ducal (blue border) vassals, you need a Kingship or Imperial border, which is Gold or Smexy Purple.

Can't play as a Baron, but the claims can be pressed.
Zodiac Feb 13, 2014 @ 4:41pm 
One thing to rember as well, is that you can pull counties out of empires without having to go to war by inheritance; However, a High/Max Crown Authority will stop this from happening, so be aware of how established said ruling dynasty is before trying to pull a duchy from say Francia, unless you know they have been having civil war.
Last edited by Zodiac; Feb 13, 2014 @ 4:43pm
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Date Posted: Feb 12, 2014 @ 5:00pm
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