Chives Aug 8 @ 2:14pm
What are the software's requirements?
Like how much memory, type of graphics cards and all the other fun stuff?
Showing 1-15 of 17 comments
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SwitSwat Aug 8 @ 2:39pm 
It's on the store page near the bottom... Just like every other game or software on Steam...
Chives Aug 8 @ 2:53pm 
Originally posted by SwitSwat:
It's on the store page near the bottom... Just like every other game or software on Steam...

Sorry just found out bout it
Pikuhchu Aug 8 @ 3:30pm 
I don't have a memory card...
ConfederateJoe Aug 8 @ 3:46pm 
Realistically, a decent GPU, say an equivalent to a GTX 640 for "OK" performance. Above that, I can say that my GTX 650 runs it very smooth unless I have a lot of advanced lighting. So a card like mine or above should prove very effective.

For a CPU, any quad core should do. I suppose it would run "OK" on like an i3 dual core as well, but better stick to 4 or more cores. I'm running a Phenom II x4 720 BE from like 2010, it was like an entry level CPU with an unlockable 4th core (which I unlocked), now days its a meh CPU, but I've managed to squeeze the most out of it by filling my mobo with the best "budget" hardware and overclocking everything along with severely optimizing windows. (Interestingly I can run new games at medium with 60ish FPS due to my vigorous work!)

RAM wise, 6GB or more. I've got 8GB DDR3 overclocked to 1800 Mhz
Last edited by ConfederateJoe; Aug 8 @ 3:51pm
raptornx01 Aug 8 @ 3:58pm 
keep in mind sfm is maxed to 3gb of ram. so adding more will only effect programs running while sfm is running, but won't help sfm run better. all adding more really means is you can run more programs at the same time.
ConfederateJoe Aug 8 @ 4:01pm 
@raptornx01
Not, if you use large address aware which lets it use more.
raptornx01 Aug 8 @ 4:02pm 
can you do that with sfm?
ConfederateJoe Aug 8 @ 4:12pm 
I have, it works, it even improved render speed a decent bit. I think the more that the RAM limit is your bottleneck the more it helps you.
Last edited by ConfederateJoe; Aug 8 @ 4:12pm
Chives Aug 8 @ 6:11pm 
Originally posted by ConfederateJoe:
Realistically, a decent GPU, say an equivalent to a GTX 640 for "OK" performance. Above that, I can say that my GTX 650 runs it very smooth unless I have a lot of advanced lighting. So a card like mine or above should prove very effective.

For a CPU, any quad core should do. I suppose it would run "OK" on like an i3 dual core as well, but better stick to 4 or more cores. I'm running a Phenom II x4 720 BE from like 2010, it was like an entry level CPU with an unlockable 4th core (which I unlocked), now days its a meh CPU, but I've managed to squeeze the most out of it by filling my mobo with the best "budget" hardware and overclocking everything along with severely optimizing windows. (Interestingly I can run new games at medium with 60ish FPS due to my vigorous work!)

RAM wise, 6GB or more. I've got 8GB DDR3 overclocked to 1800 Mhz

Can you explain GPU's and the other stuff mentioned. I'm not 100% techy.
Last edited by Chives; Aug 8 @ 6:12pm
The Resonte! Aug 8 @ 6:37pm 
you also need a NASA supercomputer
ConfederateJoe Aug 8 @ 8:20pm 
"Can you explain GPU's and the other stuff mentioned. I'm not 100% techy."

Get a GPU from Nvidia or AMD from their latest generations. Nvidia's 600 or 700 series cards or AMDs 7000 or RX cards.

so something like one of these would work great.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&DEPA=0&Order=BESTMATCH&Description=gtx+750&N=-1&isNodeId=1

For the CPU, just be sure it has 4 cores or more.
Last edited by ConfederateJoe; Aug 8 @ 8:23pm
raptornx01 Aug 8 @ 9:19pm 
A gpu is the video card.

if you right click "my computer" select properties, then click device manager. then click "display adapters" you can see what your video card is.

cpu is you comp main part. it does most of the work that isn't graphics related. they usually work in sections, called core. a quad core is like, instead of one big processor, it's four smaller ones.

ram is memory your programs use when they start up and run. they store stuff in ram to use quickly (think of a flash drive). the more ram memory, the more space there is for programs.
ConfederateJoe Aug 9 @ 7:36am 
I'll explain how it all works.

CPU
A CPU core processes in serial, meaning it can only do 1 thing at a time, but really fast obviously. This speed is measured by how fast it's internal clock is set, measured in gigahertz, for example, 3.3Ghz. Then came multi core technology, because the CPU was getting smaller and more powerful they decided to add multiple cores. Each core does things in serial like I said but together they work in parralell to get things done faster. The more cores you have the faster you can complete tasks because tasks will be split up and shared across all CPU cores. There are other factors like how efficient is the architecture and single core performances, power usage, and stuff like that as well. In general Intel makes the better CPUs, they tend to put ina bit less cores than AMD, but their CPUs are faster due to their efficient architecture, they also use less power. AMD tends to have more cores in their CPUs these days, but their single core performance is not as good. Intel costs more in general than AD though.

GPU
CPUs suck at doing graphic calculations for things like games because that's a WHOLE lot of information that needs to be processed fast, but the calculations are simple, there are just to many for the CPU to handle. So the GPU is whole bunch of slower cores, but like I said there are lots more GPU cores. The GPU works in parallel to get things done much faster.

RAM, or Memory is just a fast place to store whatever the CPU and GPU are working with at the time. as they can't really store everything they're working with in themselves or the vastly slower than RAM hard drive or SSD. Some things require more RAM than others, and in general people should have 8GB these days, not much more is required at the moment unless you're doing some heavy stuff.
R234 Aug 9 @ 9:28am 
Honestly, SFM ran perfectly fine on my old Athlon 64 X2, with 3.5 gigs of usable RAM (32-bit OS) and an ATI Radeon 4850. Some pretty old hardware, yet SFM was more than useable (I DID however have to take care not to inflate the memory footprint too much).

I highly recommend you get much better than that though. Buying weak computers is actually more expensive in the long run, since you'll have to upgrade much faster.
Last edited by R234; Aug 9 @ 9:28am
Pikuhchu Aug 9 @ 11:17am 
Originally posted by R234:
Honestly, SFM ran perfectly fine on my old Athlon 64 X2, with 3.5 gigs of usable RAM (32-bit OS) and an ATI Radeon 4850. Some pretty old hardware, yet SFM was more than useable (I DID however have to take care not to inflate the memory footprint too much).

I highly recommend you get much better than that though. Buying weak computers is actually more expensive in the long run, since you'll have to upgrade much faster.
CPU is central processing unit right? I got a Intel Pentium G2020T and 7.87 Gigs of useable RAM. No graphics card though...
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Date Posted: Aug 8 @ 2:14pm
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